Reading · Writing

Book review: The Invisible Girl by Jill Childs

Rating: 5/5

Genre: Mystery

Plot:

I know you. I know you in a way you can’t even imagine. I have been searching for you in the years since you wrote that letter – the letter that told me you were looking for me too. But now that I’ve found you, I don’t know if I can say the terrible truth of what I am. It would ruin your perfect life. It would hurt your beautiful daughter.

So, I hesitate – bide my time, for now. This morning, you’re running late and your little girl, tugged by the hand, scurries to keep up with you. She’s clean but a little scrawny. Maybe that’s because you struggle with the bills; maybe she’s just made that way.

I know what it is to have lost a child. I pray you never learn how that feels. But I can’t wait forever… and when I finally tell you my secret, will it break you like it did me all those years ago?

My verdict: I devoured this book in two days over Christmas and I am so glad I have discovered Jill child’s told from three narratives Maddy, Sarah and Sam is a story of how people come into each other’s lives at the right time but also for specific reason and how our lives can intertwine without us realising. Jill Child’s novel is one of many things; a story of a homeless woman, a stressed out newly single mum and a young woman who was adopted and brought up by church going parents. On the other hand it is a story of not taking things as they seem and not letting one series of events define you for the rest of your life and whatever stage your at in your life that it only takes one person to help you turn your life around. This book isn’t a preachy always see the good in things and is in fact gritty and real providing use with a dose of truth and at the same time delivered sensitively. This book touches on mental health, alcoholism, homelessness as well as the feeling that what you have isn’t enough. This book shows us that the friends and family we have in our lives are detrimental no matter how unconventional they may be and that you can’t always face things or do things alone, a good support network is vital and this is what these three women didn’t have until very late in their lives or things would have turned out rather differently but, after all isn’t it our experiences and challenges we deal with what shape us. You’ll want to finish this in one sitting, get your tissues ready!

Book cover belonging to Jill Childs. Click the image above to be taken to a website so that you can buy a copy. 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s